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Posts Tagged ‘Blessed Alfred the Great’

“Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

 

“This world is not our home”

Christ did not say that His kingdom was not in this world.  Christ said that His kingdom is not of this world.  All men who live or who have ever lived are of this world.  We are all born of the corrupted seed of Adam.  But all who are born again in Christ are made into a kingdom not of this world.  God the Father “hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son.”

Christ is not a king like the kings of this world.  He derives His authority from God the Father, who has given Him all authority upon Heaven and Earth.  His authority derives from on high, not from this world.

Christ’s kingdom is an eternal kingdom, it lasts through the end of the world.  Given from God the Father, this kingdom existed before the world and will outlast it.  God’s kingdom is strange to the ways of this world.  Christ shows that His government is above worldly government, which is corrupt and mortal.  His kingship is not after the manner of earthly kings.

This world is the realm of power and politics and lording it over one another.  Violence and force do not bring people to the kingdom of God; persuasion and witness do.  While violence and force have their place in this world, governed as it is by the powers of darkness, they have no place in the kingdom of God.

The kingdom of God sounds archaic, for it is a monarchy.  Christ is King.  Jesus is Lord.  We use ancient language to describe our relationship with Him.  The Roman Catholic Church goes even further by saying that cardinals are princes of the Church!

I suspect that we feel uncomfortable with the idea of Christ as our King.  We like Him very much as a baby in a manger.  I suppose other times we feel comfortable with God running things in heaven, looking out for us in his Godlike and almighty way.  But when it comes to subjecting ourselves to the rule of Christ in our daily lives, we sometimes hesitate.

When the early Church worshipped Christ, they became more and more like Christ, and they grew like wildfire.  The early Christians did not attend parishes that were most like what they wanted, make the service the way they wanted, or conform the teaching to be as they wanted.  Rather, they passed from the kingdom of this world to the kingdom of God.

And the world spat on them, as it had done before with Christ our king.  Converting to Christ is no way of accruing worldly honor.  The early Christians obeyed their Lord and Savior, they became like Him as disciples, and they grew and spread, adding souls to the kingdom.  This is the way not only of faithfulness to God, not only of resisting the sinfulness of the world, but is the way of evangelism, growth, and maturity.

Christ is the anointed monarch of heaven and earth, of Church and of Creation.  The mission of Holy Church is Christ’s salvific work in the whole broken cosmos.  In St. Paul’s Epistle to the Colossians, Christ is called the “head of every rule and authority”.  Christ created all and rules all.  We are members of His Body in that broken cosmos.  Each one of us has a high position.  Each one of us who answers the call and conforms to Christ is part of the greatest story ever told.

 

We are citizens of two cities – the city of God and the city of this world.  We are subjects of Christ our King and citizens of this world.  How we comport our lives in this world is both informed by the eternal kingdom and influences our eternal lives.  Conversely, our life under Christ our King informs our citizenship here on earth.

The zeal of the French Revolution and the political forces which followed it sought to destroy what Edmund Burke called the “little platoons” of society.  This was his poetic phrase for those free associations of people mediating between the state and the individual.  The governments of this world count Holy Mother Church as one of those institutions which must be controlled or destroyed.

The Bishop of Rome created this feast of Christ the King in 1925.  I heard it told that he did so as a challenge to communism.  There is some truth to this, but the truth is bigger yet.  The run of politics throughout the world in the 1920s continues today.  From totalitarianism to liberal democracy, modern men are inclined to accord the state, the worldly government, as the comprehensive authority over humanity.  This was not always true.  The modern state is, well, a modern development.

Christians, ruled from on high by Christ our King, ought to doubt the health of this development.  Old governments, tyrannous they might be, never reached so deeply into the lives of their subjects.  Neither the Roman Senate nor King Herod could watch us like communists or Nazis, who in turn could never so thoroughly search our private lives like the big data of networked computers, sophisticated software, ubiquitous cameras, and tracked internet activity.

This world is not our home.

 

This past Friday was the Feast of Blessed Alfred the Great.  Our collect for this feast sheds a powerful light on the proper relationship between this corrupt kingdom and the Kingdom of God:  “O God, who didst call thy servant Alfred to an earthly throne that he might advance thy heavenly kingdom….”  This part of creation is passing away.  Alfred the Great’s God-given task was to govern his earthly kingdom so to advance Christ’s heavenly kingdom.

I always crack a smile when we celebrate this Feast of Christ the King during an election season.  So we well should turn in the Prayer Book to the collects following Morning and Evening Prayer.  There, we find in A Prayer for Congress the petition that God the Father would be pleased to

direct and prosper all their consultations, to the advancement of thy glory, the good of thy Church, the safety, honour, and welfare of thy people; that all things may be so ordered and settled by their endeavours, upon the best and surest foundations, that peace and happiness, truth and justice, religion and piety, may be established among us for all generations.

The invasion of the Kingdom of God into this world would indeed bring “peace and happiness, truth and justice”, and “religion and piety”.  This would transform our world.

We ought not be bosom friends with this here haunted and broken kingdom.  We are sojourners in this world.  United with Christ, He has graciously translated us into His eternal Kingdom.  We have already begun our lives into eternity, which will be consummated on the day of doom, the day of judgement, the day when we have our new bodies and go to live with Christ forever whilst the damned are cast into the eternal flames.

As we sing in the second stanza of Hymn 209, O salutaris hostia:  “O grant us life that shall not end, In our true native land with thee.”  Our true native land is the Kingdom of God.  We were born into this world, the same world which did not welcome Christ.  But through our Baptism into the death and resurrection of Christ our Lord, we boldly “enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;” (Hebrews x.19-20) and are translated from this dying kingdom to the eternal Kingdom of God.

 

Tomorrow is the Feast of the Martyrs of Uganda, the many Anglican and Roman Catholic boys who were the pages of the pagan king of Buganda.  Concerned by encroaching colonial powers and the missionary struggles between Moslems, Romans, and Anglicans, the king doubled down on his worldly authority.  In trying the obedience of his worldly subjects, he demanded that his pages submit to him sexually.  The devout Christian boys refused.  For their disobedience to their earthly king and their obedience to the King of Heaven, they were martyred.  Nourished by their blood shed for their true king, Holy Church grew enormously in Buganda through witness and persuasion, not force and violence.

Our true home is with our Lord, where He reigns.  This world is not our home.

 

“Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

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“We give thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light:  Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

 

“Baptized into Christ’s Kingdom”

We are subjects of two kingdoms.  We are subjects of Christ our King and citizens of these United States, or whatever country you hail from.  How we live our lives in this green land of America is both informed by our Heavenly King and will influence our life in the hereafter.  Also, our life under Christ our King informs our citizenship here on earth in this great country of ours.

 

Now the kingdom of this world is not simply the domain of Satan, even though St. Paul does call it “the power of darkness”.  The kingdom of this world is that broken part of Creation, of the cosmos, that does not claim Christ as Lord.  Whereas we like to think that the saving work of Christ in the cosmos is expanding, in our own culture we see little evidence of it.  Think for instance of thirty-five years ago, when the popular television series M*A*S*H sympathetically depicted a chaplain amongst its characters.  Such a thing is foreign to television today.

Indeed, university students are increasingly told that their faith holds no bearing – or only poses a burden – on their education, when the original universities were explicitly Christian.  Unelected judges overturn same-sex marriage bans and abortion restrictions partially on the claim of there being no reasonable or non-sectarian basis for them.  In several states of this Union, courts and legislatures require citizens taking out any insurance plan to pay for elective abortions, regardless of their consciences, even though it is simply avoided.

But despite all this and the recent news out of Houston with sermons being demanded of preachers, other governments in the kingdom of this world have had it much worse.  This Wednesday we celebrate the Feast of the Martyrs of Uganda, the dozens of Anglican and Roman Catholic boys who were the sex slaves of the pagan king of Uganda and refused his lustful desires.  For their disobedience to the king of this world and their obedience to the High King of Heaven, they were put to death.  Earlier, the king had grown angry with the missionaries from the Church of England and the Church of Rome as they kept criticizing him and his support of Moslem missionaries.

This past week in Morning Prayer, we read in First Kings about Elijah, Ahab, and Jezebel, how the righteous prophet squared off against the wicked monarchs of Israel.  But before Elijah, Samuel warned Israel against having an earthly king, warning them in I Samuel viii.18:  “And ye shall cry out in that day because of your king which ye shall have chosen you; and the LORD will not hear you in that day.”

 

Worldly governments clearly fail to set out a righteous course for us to live in.  But the government of Christ the King exemplifies all good and glorious things.  Our worldly governments tell us that things which are clearly wrong are right; the government of Christ the King unerringly tells us what the wrong things are with such accuracy and precision that we cannot actually avoid them perfectly.

Today’s Epistle mentions “the inheritance of the saints in light”.  This refers to the Kingdom of God.  In the next verse, “the power of darkness” is the antithesis of the Kingdom.

“And he is the head of the body, the church:”  Coming right after speaking of “all things” and spiritual beings, this shows that the last verses here, vv 18-20, demonstrate an equivalency between the cosmos and the Church.  This is tied to the universal mission of Holy Church, to bring all people to Christ and His kingdom.  The work of the Church is Christ’s salvific work in the whole broken cosmos.  Later in ii.10, Christ is called the “head of every rule and authority”.  Christ created all and rules all, and we are members of His Body in that cosmos and Holy Church.  Each one of us is part of something epic and big.

 

Now, there is one way into Christ’s Kingdom:  Holy Baptism.  We read in St. John iii.5, “Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.”  This is our passport, our entrance; this is how we immigrate from the kingdom of the world to the kingdom of God.  When we are buried with Christ and then share in His Resurrection, we join with Him mystically and sacramentally.  When Christ commands His disciples at the end of St. Matthew’s Gospel, He says,

“All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world.”

Before we are Augustans, Georgians, or Americans, before we are black, white, or any other race of this world, before all these things, we are under the banner of Christ our King.  By virtue of our supernatural sacramental Baptism into the life and death of Christ our Lord, we are brothers and sisters of the Nigerian schoolgirl held in some African camp more fully than we are brothers and sisters to our natural sister who does not believe.  By virtue of our belief in Christ our King, we are brothers and sisters of the impoverished but faithful Haitian farmer more than we are brothers and sisters to our unbaptized brother with whom we grew up.

 

So what does this new citizenship look like?  We read in Ephesians v.1-5:

“Be ye therefore followers of God, as dear children; And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour. But fornication, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not be once named among you, as becometh saints; Neither filthiness, nor foolish talking, nor jesting, which are not convenient: but rather giving of thanks. For this ye know, that no whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God.”

First, we must walk in sacrificial loving-kindness.  We must love the Lord our God with all our hearts, with all our soul, and with all our minds, and we must love our neighbors as ourselves.  This is unbelievably difficult, but we have no alternative.  God is love, and we are to conform ourselves to God.

Second, we are very specifically told to avoid wicked behavior.  After all, Christ says, “Ye shall know them by their fruits.”  So we are to avoid fornication, uncleanness, covetousness, filthiness, foolish talking, jesting.  We are not to be whoremongers, unclean, covetous, or idolaters.  Essentially, we are to pay attention and keep the Ten Commandments.

We are to love and we are to keep moral lives.  Third, we are to give thanks.  It is no mistake that each of our regular services in our Book of Common Prayer includes a prayer of thanksgiving.  We are to thank God for the goodness in our lives.  We are to thank God for our lives, God himself, other people, and all the goodness of God.  Love without thanks is hardly love indeed.

 

Today’s Epistle begins, “Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:”

Moving from darkness into light reminds the Christian soul of the Exodus, especially the miraculous passage through the Red Sea.  While Moses his prophet stretched out his hand, the Lord caused the wind to blow on the sea, exposing the seabed so that the people of Israel could escape from Pharaoh and his army, freeing them to reach the Holy Land.  So likewise, we are in bondage to sin and death in the kingdom of this world, no matter how fine it is otherwise to us.  And God brings us out of “from the power of darkness”.  Through the miracle of Christ’s death and Resurrection, we transfer from one side to the other.

 

Having passed from the old way of death to the new way of life, Christ having given us the forgiveness of sins, so we are to imitate our God and King.

The way we worship is to obey.  And we become like Christ.  When the early Church worshipped Christ their God, they became more and more like Christ, and they grew like wildfire.  The early Christians did not visit and attend congregations to find out which ones were the most like what they wanted, asking to make the service the way they wanted, requiring the teaching to be like they wanted.  In all things, they obeyed Holy Church, they obeyed their Lord and Savior, they became like Him as disciples, and they grew and spread.  This is the way not only of faithfulness to God, not only of resisting the sinfulness of the world, but is also the way of evangelism, growth, and maturity.

Almost like the Anglo-Saxons of Wessex over eleven hundred years ago, our king is our best man, the man who exemplifies our ideals, the man whom we seek to emulate.  Blessed Alfred the Great, King of Wessex was one such king of this world; Christ, the King of Heaven and Earth, is the king of the whole cosmos and of the whole Church.

With God, we know who is king.  We know that His rule is always right and holy.  We know that we have no say in His rule.  And indeed, while God wants our whole selves, our souls and bodies, we actually live in great freedom, freedom from sin, death, and Hell.

God the Father calls us to live our lives in the service of Christ our King.  We are to live meek, humble lives in penitence and holiness, avoiding sin, and loving our God with our whole being and our neighbor as ourselves.

 

“We give thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light:  Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

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