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Posts Tagged ‘Hercules’

“These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

 

I John v.4-5:  “For whatsoever is born of God overcometh the world: and this is the victory that overcometh the world, even our faith.  Who is he that overcometh the world, but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God?”

Peace comes from overcoming the world; those of us who believe in Christ overcome the world, as Christ has overcome the world.

In today’s Gospel, the words of Christ were directed to His disciples.  The scattering of the disciples cannot take away the peace which Christ gives.  This is like Christ not being alone during His crucifixion because He remained in communion with the Father.

Francis Moloney says that “The oneness between Jesus and the Father is Jesus’ assurance of victory, no matter how convincingly the forces of this world may appear to have won the day in the violence that will terminate Jesus’ life.”

So to His initial disciples Christ says that His victory is so universal and complete that He can promise peace to His troubled and failing disciples.  They are unable to accept His departure, they are unable to remain steadfast at His side, they are unable to keep from losing hope, and yet they possess the peace of Christ.  Obviously, this peace does not look like the peace of the world with which we are familiar.

The scattering of the disciples is akin to inexcusable failure among us.

Amidst our own failures, even amidst our own death, when we are so very alone and no one else present shares what we are going through, we are not alone; Christ is with us.  We worry so much about our present cares and worries, about the messes of our families and ourselves, about the pain and consternation others experience that we forget about the example of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, Who when He hung alone on the hard wood of the Cross enjoyed mystic communion with God the Father in Heaven and was by no means alone.  He is our salvation; He is our communion with God the Father in Heaven.  When we are with Him, we are never alone, we are entirely at peace; there is no force in the world, no sin, no temptation, no devil, no enemy that can disrupt us.  If the connection relied upon our own feeble miserable powers, then we would have much to fear.  We should tremble and shake and jump at our own shadow, for death and disgrace would be ready to jump us at any time.  But not so with Christ!  He has won the victory!  He tells us, “I have overcome the world.”  Not just the evil forces of the world, not just the natural calamities of the world, not just the wicked hearts of men who rule the world, but He has overcome the world and all that therein is.  He is supremely victorious.  Christ has defeated death itself.

In ancient classic stories, we read about heroic deeds.  Prometheus stole fire from the gods.  Beowulf slew Grendel.  Hercules killed the Hydra.  But Christ defeated death.  And unlike Prometheus, Beowulf, and Hercules, Christ is a historical figure of antiquity, born a Jew in the Roman Empire and judged by Pilate.  Christ defeated death.  Unless He returns in the Second Advent before our death, we will have to suffer our own personal death.  But as we walk through the valley of the shadow of death, Christ has been there before us, and He will be there with us as we ourselves go.  Even in death, we will not be alone.  Even in death, we will have the peace of God.

The peace of man is peaceful and restful indeed.  When we receive a good night’s sleep, we enjoy a bit of worldly peace.  Nothing stirs us.  Our dreams are lovely.  We awake refreshed.  We do not feel well rested every night, but when we do, we have experienced a bit of worldly peace.

As a child, I fished for bream with a cane pole beside my grandfather.  The occasional breeze through the still hot air, song of a bird, and ploop from the lake when a turtle moved were all I could hear.  We sat in silence; we sat in peace.  I remember those days, and I miss those days.  Fishing with my grandfather was lovely.  But it brought me only a peace of this world.

To look for a deeper peace, I consider my days as a hospital chaplain in the Labor and Delivery ward.  The anxiety, pain, and weariness of the ladies before their child was delivered stay with me.  But I remember many mothers on the other side of their labor.  With exhausted but peaceful smiles, they could hardly take their eyes off their babies.  Mother and child had both passed successfully through the hours of agony and travail.  The mother was no longer expecting; the child who was so long expected was now with the family.  Like a nativity scene, family members and friends and nurses gathered around to adore the mother and child.  The whole child’s life lies before them, with trials and problems and restless nights.  Yet the danger and pain of childbirth has ended.  New life is out into the world.  Tomorrow’s challenges are for tomorrow; today she may rest from her labors.  And yet even this peace, this lovely and blessed peace, is still of this world.

Christ promises a peace which transcends our experience and our imagination.  If we dismiss this peace or consign it to some worldly meaning, then we do it and the bringer of it, Christ Jesus, a disservice.  The peace of God is not necessarily a peace of rest, of comfort, and of recuperation.  The peace of Christ exists when the disciples break discipline and scatter before the enemies of Christ, even though Christ has overcome the world.  This peace of Christ is not dependent upon us, but upon Christ.  This peace of Christ is not brought about by our good works or serene thoughts.  This peace does not come from within.  This peace comes from without; it comes from Christ, as Christ comes from God the Father in Heaven.

When we attempt to build peace for ourselves, we build it on top of things which can neither bear such a tremendous weight nor such a precious cargo.  We build our peace atop a pile of money for financial security.  We build our peace atop a pile of family whom we love and who will support us when we need them.  We build our peace atop a church service that feels comfortable to us instead of one that truly proclaims the Word of God.  We build our peace atop a sense of well-being that accompanies a privileged place in our society, a gentleman, a veteran, a mother, a priest.  We build our peace atop good things that cannot bear the weight, and since they cannot bear the weight, our peace is a lie that is about to crumble beneath and overthrow us.  Only when our peace is built upon the rock of our salvation, Jesus Christ, do we have someone unassailable and sturdy to rely entirely upon.

Peace is promised to us in Holy Scripture.  In Isaiah (ix.6) we read:  “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counseller, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.”

Earlier in St. John’s Gospel (xiv.27), Jesus says:  “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you.  Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”

St. Paul writes in Philippians (iv.6-7):  “Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God.  And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.”

We have this peace; we must adjust ourselves to Christ so that we may feel this peace and use it in our lives; we must stop resisting God’s love and plan for us so that we might grow into the mature Christian adults He wants us to be, so that we might enjoy Heaven with Him and serve as a light to this broken and distressed world so that we might bring Christ to others.

Christ’s peace was based upon the unshakable rock of God the Father.  Our hope likewise is to rest on Christ, unshakeable rock that He is, Who has overcome the world and defeated death itself.  We can face anything if we rest in Christ, for what can shake us?  What can move us?  Poor Job did not know Christ when he faced his catastrophes, yet he still had faith in God.  Death cannot break our peace and overthrow us, for Christ is our rock and our salvation and He has defeated death.  The loss of our riches, our families, our homes, our friends all cannot assail the peace of God, because his peace is not predicated upon such secondary goods; it is founded squarely upon Christ Himself.

This is why we love Christ more than our children or our spouses.  Like it or not, we will one day lose our children and our spouses, but we need never lose Christ.  Like it or not, one day we will be separated from that money, but we need never lose Christ.  We may go blind and never see another sunset; our senses of taste and smell might fail so that we never enjoy our favorite meal again.  We may go deaf and not be able to hold a conversation with those around us.  But we need never lose Christ.  If Satan and his evil angels and all the powers of Hell were to assail you when you got home this afternoon, for all the harm and foulness he could do to you, he could never, no not ever, take Christ away from you.  We are absolutely unassailable in our relationship with Jesus Christ.  Nobody can ever take away our Baptism and our salvation.  Nobody can strip away from us our Confirmation and the seven-fold gifts of the Holy Ghost.  Others can take away our property, our freedom, and our lives, but they cannot strip from us our salvation and ultimate peace in Jesus Christ.

Christ has overcome the world, and therein is why the disciples have peace.  Christ has left us to Ascend to the Father, and we are broken and pitiful men and women.  Yet we have the deepest peace there is:  unity with Christ and thereby with the Father, and soon, at Pentecost, with God the Holy Ghost.  We are deeply and profoundly united with God through Christ and in the Holy Ghost.  Amidst the pains and harrowing suffering of this wicked world wherein the Prince of this world has authority, we live with God even now, we have peace even now.

 

“These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

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