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Posts Tagged ‘prayer and fasting’

“BE ye therefore followers of God, as dear children; and walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling savour.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

 

The disciples who followed Christ literally followed where He went and did what He did.  They learned by doing.  In that sense, I was a disciple of my father in my early years.  I remember the first time I sat in front of my father on stage at our pre-school.  I crossed my legs the same way he did because, although I was scared in front of all those people, it was safe and right to imitate my daddy.  Disciples follow and imitate.  In this way, disciples are like children.  This is how St. Paul can open up this reading of Ephesians with “BE ye therefore followers of God, as dear children;” for followers and children are so very similar.

 

We are to imitate Christ.  One of the most famous and popular books of Christian devotion for all time, treasured by the likes of Ignatius of Loyola, John Wesley, and Robert E. Lee, is Thomas a Kempis’s The Imitation of Christ.  I strongly recommend each of you to consider reading it.

We are to imitate Christ’s loving-kindness.  We must walk in love.  Loving-kindness is the essential ingredient in following Christ – loving in our hearts, loving in our minds, loving in our bodies.  All that we do must be in love.  If we truly act in love, then we are imitating Christ.

The Prayer of St. Francis, written in the early years of the XX Century and not by him, faithfully sums up his teaching and offers us a most excellent understanding of living in love and imitating Christ.  A lovely needlework of this prayer is hung above our coffee pots next to the kitchen door in the parish hall.  I invite you all to recall Christ’s love of you and your imitation of Christ when you pass by this embroidered prayer.  This is the prayer:

Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;

Where there is hatred, let me sow love;

Where there is injury, pardon;

Where there is error, truth;

Where there is doubt, faith;

Where there is despair, hope;

Where there is darkness, light;

And where there is sadness, joy.

O Divine Master, Grant that I may not so much seek

To be consoled as to console;

To be understood as to understand;

To be loved as to love.

For it is in giving that we receive;

It is in pardoning that we are pardoned;

And it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

Throughout the history of Holy Church, imitating Christ and following the way of love has had several components.  One part has been the soul’s interior regard of love – recollection of love, intercessory prayer, and acts of devotion.  Another part has involved the soul deeply in participation in the Body and Blood of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament.  A third part has emphasized outward and physical performances of love.

 

Through our Incarnate Son of God, we are to imitate God.  We are created in his image, and although we, his handiwork, have been defaced by sin, the original stamp of God on us remains.  Our human nature has fallen into sin, but first God created it in his image.

Our part of Christ’s redemption of us is imitating God.  We are to imitate God, and the way we do that is through the love and sacrifice of Christ.  Christ sacrificed His high station in Heaven and His life upon the Cross for us to God the Father.  This is love.  Love and sacrifice go hand in hand.  Love without sacrifice is hollow and empty.  Sacrifice without love is meaningless and despairing.  Sacrifice in love redeems the world.  If you and I imitate Christ and sacrifice for one another in loving-kindness, you and I can move mountains.

We complain about budget deficits, empty pews, and lack of activities.  We complain about crooked politicians, policies working against God’s laws, and wicked behavior in high places.  We complain about broken families, alienated loved ones, and lost friends.  But we have an answer for all these:  Christ.

But when we say the answer is Christ, in our despair we cry out like atheists.  But what about right now?  What about those hurting people?  What about my hurts?  Yes, Christ cleansed us from our sin in Holy Baptism.  Yes, Christ has won the victory and will return one day in power and great glory.  But what about now?  What about my sick spouse?  What about my dead child?  What about my scorned neighbor?  Oh Lord, what about my lost job?

And by the answer, “Christ”, we mean the love and sacrifice of Christ lived out in our lives.  Christians are members of Christ’s Body, the Church.  We imitate God in Christ our Lord.  We love one another not out of indifference, not until it becomes uncomfortable, but we love one another, as known persons with faces, unto sacrifice.

Like Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathitein in the second chapter of Job, we sit in the ashes with our grieving friend seven days and seven nights without saying a word.  And unlike Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, we don’t get smart with our opinions starting on the eighth day.  We sit in the ashes with our grieving friend.  That is love and sacrifice, my dear children.

Remember how Christ said to turn the other cheek, to give the man who asks for a coat your cloak as well, to walk the extra mile?  Love does not involve what you can get away with doing.  We are to love unto sacrifice.  We are to enter into hurt ourselves on behalf of another.

That means that we listen to one another even when they irritate us horribly.  That means that we shut our mouths when someone wants to share their pain with us.  That means that we put our rear in gear and get off our duff, roll up our sleeves, and help someone out.  That means that we weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice.  We move beyond our own comfort, our own self-satisfied opinions,and our own hurts to move out into the world of hurt and pain and sorrow and misery propelled by our Savior’s love and sacrifice for us, taking His healing balm into the world that knows original and actual sin and nothing but natural remedies, not a one of which avails.

We imitate Christ when we interpose ourselves between pain, sin, and disorder and our beloved brother.  On our wedding day, a family friend found me and kept kidding around with jokes until my brother and I walked out to the altar.  Stupid silly jokes kept me from getting anxious before the service on our big day.  That is interposing between disorder and our brother.

We imitate Christ when we pick up the burden our brother must carry.  St. Simon of Cyrene was compelled to bear the Cross of our Lord on His way to Calvary.  A well-known example in the church of doing this is when the ladies of the parish provide plenty of food for a grieving family.  We ate chicken casseroles and ham for a month after my father died.  Our grief was so profound that feeding ourselves was difficult.  The ladies of our church fed us during that time.  God bless them for it.  This too is interposing between death and our brother.

We imitate Christ when we pay what our brother must pay.  The Good Samaritan paid the room and board and medical costs of the wounded Jew.  Mrs. Day of Day’s Inn paid for the Mercer University education of one of my friends who lost her father fleeing from the Communists in Cambodia and arrived in America with nothing.  Mrs. Day had a fortune.  My friend had no money.  But thanks to Mrs. Day, she received a very nice private college education, became wealthy, and now helps spread that wealth to those who have very little themselves.  God bless both of them for it.  This also is interposing between poverty and our brother.

In his Epistle to the Galatians, vi.2, St. Paul writes:  “Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.”  We are not Christians if we do not bear one another’s burdens.  We are not followers of Christ if we do not walk the Way of the Cross.  We are not participating in Christ’s ministry if we do not interpose between sin, death, and wickedness and our brother.  Christ tells us in the Summary of the Law to “Love thy neighbor as thyself.”  This is how we spread the Good News of Christ.  This is how we serve to forward the Kingdom of God.  This is how we imitate God.  This is how we imitate Christ.

This holy season of Lent, each of you search yourself.  Examine your thoughts, your heart, and your actions.  Do you love your neighbor in your thoughts?  Do you sacrifice for your brother in your heart?  Do you interpose on behalf of your brother in your actions?  If you are like the rest of us, and you are, then you are failing to love like Christ somewhere in your life.

In prayer and fasting, through the grace of the Holy Ghost, find that place that needs changing.  Resolve to change that.  Say it out loud to yourself, write it down someplace where you will see it every day.  Change this.  God the Holy Ghost will ably assist you in conforming to Christ and doing God the Father’s holy will on earth.

 

“BE ye therefore followers of God, as dear children; and walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling savour.”

+ In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.

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